Investigations in Number, Data, and Space, investigations math curriculum reviews 3rd Edition
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Investigations in Number, Data, and Space, investigations math curriculum reviews 3rd Edition
The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for giving attention throughout the year to individual standards that set an expectation for procedural skill and fluency. The materials include opportunities to practice and review in order to build procedural skill and fluency. Students are provided Daily Practice in every session and Homework in many sessions. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for focus on major work and coherence. The instructional materials do not meet the expectations for focus due to not spending a majority of class time on major work. The instructional materials partially meet the expectations for coherence, and they show strengths in having an amount of content that is viable for one school year and fostering coherence through connections within the grade. In general, conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application are all adequately addressed in the Sessions; however, for the most part they are addressed in separate sections of the instructional materials. Conceptual understanding is typically addressed in the Discussion and Math Workshop portions of Sessions. Procedural skill and fluency is typically introduced in separate Sessions and then practiced in the Daily Practice portion of sessions. Application consists of routine word problems in the instructional materials. As a result, all aspects of rigor are almost always treated separately within the curriculum including within and during Sessions, Practice, and Homework. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for rigor and the mathematical practices. The materials meet the expectations for rigor as they help students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and applications. However, the materials partially meet the expectations for mathematical practices as they do not attend to the full meaning for each of the MPs and rarely prompt, or have the teachers prompt, students to analyze the arguments of others. In order to be reviewed and attain a rating for usability , the instructional materials must first meet expectations for alignment . Practice with application of 3.OA.8 is found throughout five units of instruction. Standard 3.OA.8, solve two-step word problems using the four operations, is found in sessions within Units 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8. In Unit 5 Session 3.3 students are asked to solve multi-step word problems including “Arthur orders eight 70-packs of balloons and two 9-packs of marbles to sell at his party store. How many items does he order from The Toy Factory?” The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for rigor and the mathematical practices. The materials meet the expectations for rigor as they help students develop conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and applications. However, the materials partially meet the expectations for mathematical practices as they do not attend to the full meaning for each of the MPs and rarely prompt, or have the teachers prompt, students to analyze the arguments of others. The materials do not consistently relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. The scope and sequence found in the Implementing Investigations book gives some limited information relating to knowledge from earlier and future grades by listing major topics and which units in prior and future grades address those topics. Each unit has a “Connections: Looking Back” section at the beginning of the unit. Several units specifically refer to work from prior grades without providing explicit connections to specific standards. The instructional materials include problems and activities that connect two or more clusters in a domain or two or more domains. Content from future grades is introduced occasionally on Grade 3 assessments. These items could easily be modified to stay on grade-level. Occasionally supporting standards are used to support the major work of the grade. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for assessing grade-level content. Most of the assessments include material that is appropriate for Grade 3. In the instances where material is above grade-level, the material could easily be omitted or modified by the teacher to assess the grade-level standards being addressed. Probability, statistical distributions, similarity, transformations and congruence do not appear in the assessments. Standard 3.OA.7 requires students to fluently find single-digit products and quotients. Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded. Most of the time when MP3 is referenced, teachers are asked to have students share or explain their solutions. Teachers are also directed to have students ask questions but are not supported in focusing those questions toward critiquing the arguments of others. Gateways 1 and 2 focus on questions of alignment to the standards. Are the instructional materials aligned to the standards? Are all standards present and treated with appropriate depth and quality required to support student learning? The K-8 Evidence Guides complements the review criteria by elaborating details for each indicator including the purpose of the indicator, information on how to collect evidence, guiding questions and discussion prompts, and scoring criteria. We thought so! Sign up and be the first to know when we release a new report. The instructional materials are separated into eight units. Each unit is composed of two, three, or four investigations, and each investigation is divided into sessions. The Implementing Investigations guide states in Part 4 within the Overview that each session includes a Classroom Routine activity that is “introduced as a session activity and are then used outside of math time or integrated into the math lesson as the first 10 minutes of a 70-minute math block.” The Ten-Minute Math activity provides practice with current skills or review of previously learned skills. Each session requires sixty minutes. Three perspectives were used when calculating major work of the grade: number of investigations, number of minutes , and number of sessions . The materials assist teachers, at times, in engaging students in constructing viable and analyzing the argument of others. Gateway 3 focuses on the question of usability. Are the instructional materials user-friendly for students and educators? Materials must be well designed to facilitate student learning and enhance a teacher’s ability to differentiate and build knowledge within the classroom. The instructional materials reviewed do not meet the expectation for students and teachers devoting the large majority of class time to the major work of the grade when the materials are used as designed. Overall, the materials do not spend at least 65% of class time on the major work of Grade 3. Although some attempts to connect supporting work to major work are made, students can often complete problems aligned to supporting work without engaging in the major work of the grade. Practice for 3.OA.3, use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, is found in three units of instruction. Within Units 1, 5, and 8 materials focus on one-step problems, scaffolded two-step problems, or two-step problems with inverse operations. In Units 5 and 8, there are six lessons that focus on the concept of division. The students solve single-step, division word problems such as “There are 24 students in Ms Smith’s class. She wants to place them into 4 equal groups. How many students are in each group?” The mathematics review criteria identifies the indicators for high-quality instructional materials. The review criteria supports a sequential review process that reflect the importance of alignment to the standards then consider other high-quality attributes of curriculum as recommended by educators. investigations math curriculum reviews The materials often give all students extensive work with grade-level problems. The instructional materials reviewed meet the expectation for not assessing topics before the grade-level in which the topic should be introduced. Overall, there are assessment items that align to topics beyond Grade 3, but these items could be modified or omitted without affecting the underlying structure of the materials. At times, the instructional materials only attend superficially to MPs. The following are examples:
The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for balance of the three aspects of rigor within a grade. Although the instructional materials meet expectations for each aspect of rigor, these aspects of rigor are often addressed in separate parts of the Sessions. Materials targeting application are often scaffolded, detracting from the balance of rigor. Overall, the three aspects of rigor are most commonly treated separately. The materials begin each investigation with a planner that lists objectives for each session, and in the session materials, Math Focus points are listed at the beginning of each session. The instructional materials include objectives and Math Focus points that are visibly shaped by the CCSSM cluster headings for Grade 3. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for prompting students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics. Alignment and usability ratings are assigned based on how materials score on a series of criteria and indicators with reviewers providing supporting evidence to determine and substantiate each point awarded. For ELA and math, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career. Materials must meet or partially meet expectations for the first set of indicators to move to the other gateways. At times, the materials prompt students to construct viable arguments and analyze the arguments of others. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for alignment to the CCSSM. The materials partially meet the expectations for focus and coherence in Gateway 1, and they partially meet the expectations for rigor and the mathematical practices in Gateway 2. Since the materials partially meet the expectations for alignment, evidence concerning instructional supports and usability indicators in Gateway 3 was not collected. Standard 3.NBT.2 requires students to fluently add and subtract within 1000. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for practice-content connections. Overall, the materials show strengths in identifying and using the MPs to enrich the content along with attending to the specialize language of mathematics. However, the materials do not always attend to the full meaning of each MP, and there are few opportunities for students to analyze the arguments of others either through prompts from the materials or from their teachers. For science, alignment ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards, including that all standards are present and treated with the appropriate depth to support students in learning the skills and knowledge that they need to be ready for college and career. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 do not meet the expectations for spending the majority of class time on the major clusters of the grade. Overall, approximately 63 percent of class time is spent on major work of the grade. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for being coherent and consistent with the Standards. The instructional materials show strength in having an amount of content that is viable for one school year, but due to not always identifying work that is off grade-level, the materials are not always consistent with the progressions in the Standards. The materials do foster coherence through connections within the grade, but few of those connections are between major work of the grade and supporting work. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for assisting teachers in engaging students in constructing viable arguments and analyzing the arguments of others concerning key grade-level mathematics detailed in the content standards. For math, our review criteria evaluates materials based on: The instructional materials for Grade 3 meet the expectations for identifying the Standards for Mathematical Practice and using them to enrich the mathematical content. The MPs are clearly identified in Implementing Investigations on page 44 and can also be found in each unit. The instructional materials highlight two MPs in every unit. During the sessions, Math Practice Notes dialogue boxes are given to provide tips to the teacher on how to engage students in the MPs. Additionally, Math Practice Notes are provided for the MPs that are not highlighted so students continue to work on the practices all year. In the teacher’s edition, assessments for each unit are listed including portfolio opportunities recommending which student work would be appropriate. Assessments are found in the Assessment Sourcebook . When MP3 is referenced, students are often asked to solve and share solutions. The independent work of the student is most often about finding the solution to a problem without creating a viable argument. Students often listen to peer solutions without being asked to critique the reasoning of the other student. Much of the student engagement in the class discussion is teacher prompted without giving students the opportunity to create their own authentic inquiry in the thinking of others. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for explicitly attending to the specialized language of mathematics. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for fostering coherence through connections at a single grade, where appropriate and required by the Standards. The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for developing conceptual understanding of key mathematical concepts, especially where called for in specific standards or cluster headings. In the instructional materials visual representations, verbal explanations, and written equations are used to develop conceptual understanding. For all content areas, usability ratings represent the degree to which materials meet expectations, partially meet expectations, or do not meet expectations for effective practices for use and design, teacher planning and learning, assessment, differentiated instruction, and effective technology use. The third perspective, number of Sessions, is the most reflective of the instructional materials because it is based on the Sessions which includes the instructional activities, review, and practice but does not include the Ten-Minute Math activity that is done outside of math time. As a result, approximately 63 percent of the materials focus on major work of the grade. The materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet the expectations for being consistent with the progressions in the Standards. In general, the materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards, but content from future grades is not clearly identified. The materials provide extensive work with grade-level problems for most standards, but the materials do not relate grade-level concepts explicitly to prior knowledge from earlier grades. Math Practice Notes are provided in sessions alongside content. Math Practice notes are provided for the MPs highlighted within the unit and MPs that are not the highlighted practices for the unit. At times, the instructional materials fully attend to a specific MP. The following is an example: Licensees may copy, distribute, display and perform only verbatim copies of reports, not derivative works and remixes based on it, and must attribute and anchor back to . The EdReports rubric supports a sequential review process through three gateways. These gateways reflect the importance of alignment to college and career ready standards and considers other attributes of high-quality curriculum, such as usability and design, as recommended by educators. The materials develop according to the grade-by-grade progressions in the Standards, but content from future grades is not clearly identified. Examples of unclear identification include: The instructional materials provide opportunities for teachers to say mathematical terms to students during the whole group portion of the lessons. The materials use precise and accurate terminology when describing mathematics. New terminology is introduced on the summary page of the TE at the beginning of the session where it will first be used. The mathematical terminology is highlighted in italics throughout the sessions within the TE. There is also an index at the end of each unit manual in which math terms are listed for the unit. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations that supporting content enhances focus and coherence simultaneously by engaging students in the major work of the grade. Supporting standards are not always used to support major work of the grade and often appear in lessons with few connections to the major work of the grade. The Introduction and Overview of each unit includes a “Mathematical Practices in this Unit” section. This section of each unit highlights the two MPs that are the focus of the unit. The MPs are described and examples from the unit are provided. A chart showing where Mathematical Practice Notes occur and when the MP is assessed is also included in this section. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 3 partially meet expectations that materials carefully attend to the full meaning of each practice standard . Although the instructional materials attend to the full meaning of some of the MPs, there are some MPs for which the full meaning is not developed. The materials reviewed for Grade 3 meet the expectations for teachers and students spending sufficient time working with engaging applications of the mathematics, without losing focus on the major work of each grade. Please note: Reports published beginning in 2021 will be using version 1. can cbc detect covid 5